ANGELA CARTER BLUEBEARD PDF

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Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover. Error rating book. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Details if other :. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Preview — Bluebeard by Angela Carter. Bluebeard by Angela Carter. In these seven stories, bristling with f 'Curiosity is the most fleeting of pleasures; the moment is satisfied, it ceases to exist and it always proves very, very expensive.

In these seven stories, bristling with frank, earthy humour and gothic imagination, nothing is as it seems. Get A Copy. Paperback , Penguin Mini Modern Classics , 64 pages. More Details Other Editions 2.

Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Bluebeard , please sign up. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 3. Rating details. Sort order. Start your review of Bluebeard. May 13, Cecily rated it liked it Shelves: classics , miscellaneous-fiction , short-stories-and-novellas. A funny little book - and it is very little 64 pages, each about half the size of a normal paperback page.

It's not bad, but far, far better, is her feast of bloodier, darker tales, The Bloody Chamber , which I reviewed here Angela Carter retells seven of Charles Perrault's classic fairytales - though two I'd never heard of. In fact, the telling is mostly traditional, but with an explicit moral or two appended, some of which have a more modern slant.

I'm not really sure of its purpose or intende A funny little book - and it is very little 64 pages, each about half the size of a normal paperback page.

I'm not really sure of its purpose or intended audience, as it's slightly too knowing and unillustrated for small children, but not really subversive enough for real adult enjoyment. Some of the "morals" are dubious, and surprising coming from a female author, yet they're not witty enough to be taken as jokes. Or maybe I've missed the point. I will now read Vonnegut's weirder take on the story. Bluebeard Bluebeard is worse than Rochester, and his beard is literally blue.

He marries, despite the fact he "had been married several times before and nobody knew what became of his wives", and a short while after, goes away on business. He gives his wife all the keys and tells her to have the run of the house and its riches, invite her friends and do whatever makes her happy. His only stipulation is that she must not use the tiniest key, and that the consequences will be dire if she does. Just as with the apple in Eden, what is forbidden proves irresistible, despite the lusher alternatives.

In this case, the room contains the bloodied bodies of murdered former wives. However, the real problem is that, like Lady Macbeth's hands, the blood won't wash off the key, so she is found out.

Morals: "Curiosity is a charming passion but may only be satisfied at the price of a thousand regrets Little Red Riding Hood A completely traditional telling.

Morals: Don't talk to strangers fine but if you do, don't be surprised if it ends badly sounds like victim blaming. It then warns of real-life men who sweet-talk young girls, but are really "the most dangerous beasts of all". Puss in Boots A completely traditional telling. Morals are quirkier: Hard work and ingenuity trump inherited wealth.

Also "clothes, bearing and youth speedily inspire affection; and the means to achieve them are not always entirely commendable. A few twists and turns follow all new to me , but of course, it all ends happily and justly. Morals: It's good to wait for the right man, but years is too long, and "long engagements make for happy marriages, but young girls these days [written in !

Morals - these are odd: Charm trumps beauty - except that doesn't fit the story, despite Carter's claim that "When her godmother dressed Cinderella up and told her how to behave at the ball, she instructed her in charm. But however great may be your god-given store, they will never help you get on in the world unless you have either a godfather or godmother to put them to work for you"! Ricky with the Tuft I've never heard of this, so had no idea if Carter has changed it at all, though Petra's excellent review implies not.

The question is, which is better: beauty or brains? I have a relative who hoped her girls would be pretty rather than clever - as if they're mutually exclusive. Anyway, Ricky is an extraordinarily ugly baby prince, but blessed with wit and brains.

In a nearby kingdom, twin princesses are born: one beautiful but stupid, and the other, clever but ugly. The fairytale twist is that whoever Ricky falls in love with will attain his level of intelligence, and whoever the pretty princess falls in love with will attain or appear to her to attain her level of attractiveness. The other sister is rather irrelevant, so the worrying message seems to be that beauty matters more than brains. Moral: Ying and yang and love is blind - or at least, armed with rose-tinted specs.

The Foolish Wishes People being granted wishes and using them stupidly is a fairytale staple, but I'd not heard this version before. It's just a short and slightly amusing example of how people waste opportunities. Moral: People are stupid. Or, as Carter prefers to put it, "Greedy, short-sighted, careless, thoughtless, changeable people don't really know how to make sensible decisions; and few of us are capable of using well the gifts God gave us, anyway.

View all 7 comments. Jun 26, Andy Weston rated it really liked it. These short stories, headlined by Bluebeard , are retelling of classic fairy tales. Good, if not brief, entertainment. Feb 18, For Books' Sake rated it liked it. But be warned, if you read Bluebeard hoping for more of The Bloody Chamber it may feel a little like having to drink a beaker of cheap house red after enjoying a goblet of full bodied, rich Rioja. Feb 17, Shelly rated it it was ok Shelves: collections.

Someone should tell Penguin what the definition of the word "subversive" is. Aug 26, Mark J Easton rated it it was ok. I was very much looking forward to reading a small collection of Angela Carter's dark fairy tales, and while it's an excellent collection of stories told with pace and precision, I was disappointed to realise the stories are, in essence, faithful translations of Perrault's tales.

So while the stories provide simple and unadulterated fun, that they're more Perrault than Angela Carter makes the book's attribution to Carter something of a mockery. Shame on Penguin for the immorality of their marketi I was very much looking forward to reading a small collection of Angela Carter's dark fairy tales, and while it's an excellent collection of stories told with pace and precision, I was disappointed to realise the stories are, in essence, faithful translations of Perrault's tales.

Shame on Penguin for the immorality of their marketing department. Dec 10, P. Wilson rated it did not like it. Not what is on the tin as it were. The book itself would be a pleasant 6. However, it is not sold as such. It is sold saying it is a subversive retelling which is a lie. This work makes me think of a line from the Simpsons "Get some new oldies, Geniuses. When you are a company that makes your money off of classics your market is not going to be the greatest so create some new masterpieces and Not what is on the tin as it were.

When you are a company that makes your money off of classics your market is not going to be the greatest so create some new masterpieces and then spin a tale on the back cover to get the audience to purchase it. Sep 28, Clare Holman-Hobbs rated it it was amazing Shelves: retellings , fairy-tales , 5-stars , favorites , feminism , , classics-challenge , owned , short-stories. I bloody haha! So enjoyable to read. Angela Carter made a wonderful although liberal translation of Charles Perrault's originals.

Mar 14, rebecca rated it it was ok Shelves: 20th-century , french , women-authors. I picked this little book up excited to finally discover Angela Carter's writing — but Bluebeard , behind its promising title, is just a collection of Charles Perrault's original fairy tales, translated from French to English, with a handful of updated morals thrown in.

The large-print name on the cover should be Charles Perrault! May 17, Lucy rated it it was ok. I didn't get the point of this, at all.

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You think you can predict the twists and turns of the ensuing ride, but are instead taken on an electrifying, exotic journey that will stimulate you from beginning to end. The Bloody Chamber injects new energy into traditional tales and motifs by deconstructing and transforming some of the core elements that support such stories. Indeed, she has declared:. Subsequently, for many feminists who saw pornography purely as the eroticization of male power and female weakness, the stories in The Bloody Chamber, which are permeated by sexual violence, sexual gratification, erotic desire and sadism, were unsuccessful in achieving a feminist objective. Therefore, by tackling such deep rooted customs and concepts, the reader is forced to respond due to familiarity with the old story when faced with the implications of the new one.

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Rewriting fairytales: the bloody chamber

The stories share a theme of being closely based upon fairytales or folk tales. However, Carter has stated:. My intention was not to do 'versions' or, as the American edition of the book said, horribly, 'adult' fairy tales, but to extract the latent content from the traditional stories. The tales vary greatly in length, with the novelette "The Bloody Chamber" being "more than twice the length of any of the other stories, and more than thirty times the length of the shortest [the vignette "The Snow Child"]. The anthology's contents are also reprinted in Carter's Burning Your Boats.

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‘Bluebeard’ by Angela Carter

The beauty is changed into a beast, a beautiful one, by means of one of the more memorable sex acts in twentieth-century fiction. He paces back and forth:. I squatted on the wet straw and stretched out my hand. I was now within the field of force of his golden eyes.

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