ANGIOFIBROMA NASOFARNGEO JUVENIL PDF

Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma JNA is a benign vascular tumor that appears in the nasal cavity. Although it is non-malignant not cancerous , it can expand quickly and extensively. JNA can spread into a variety of compartments in the head — including the sinuses, the orbit where the eye is located , and the brain — which can make it very difficult to treat. Your first visit and primary team will be located in Otolaryngology. A neurosurgeon may also be involved.

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Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma JNA is a benign vascular tumor that appears in the nasal cavity. Although it is non-malignant not cancerous , it can expand quickly and extensively. JNA can spread into a variety of compartments in the head — including the sinuses, the orbit where the eye is located , and the brain — which can make it very difficult to treat.

Your first visit and primary team will be located in Otolaryngology. A neurosurgeon may also be involved. For Patients. Contact the Department of Otolaryngology and Communication Enhancement Fax Schedule An Appointment.

Monday-Friday ampm. Saturday ampm. Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma. JNA generally affects adolescent boys; very infrequently it presents in younger children or post-adolescent males; it is rarely, if ever, seen in a female. Typically, once patients with JNA reach their early 20s, the disease mysteriously begins to resolve.

Rarely, in some patients, the disease will continue into their 30s. Surgery is the principal treatment. In cases where the entire tumor cannot be surgically removed, patients may receive medications to minimize tumor growth until the disease resolves in early adulthood.

JNA is extremely rare, with only about 50 new cases per year in the U. Our multidisciplinary team is also conducting research to determine the molecular underpinnings of JNA. We hope to someday discover what causes the disease and to determine whether targeted therapies might be used to treat JNA. For years, families have come from around the corner and across the world, looking to Boston Children's for answers.

This is the place where the most difficult challenges are faced head on, where the impossible becomes possible, and where families in search of answers find them. Sandra L. Fenwick, CEO. Connect with Boston Children's Hospital. How can we help?

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Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma

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Juvenile Angiofibroma: Current Management Strategies

Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas JNA are a rare benign but locally aggressive vascular tumor. Epidemiology Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas. Juvenile angiofibroma JNA is a benign tumor that tends to bleed and occurs in the nasopharynx of prepubertal and adolescent males. The second patient, also with a Fisch I tumor, underwent clamping of the external carotid arteries without embolization. Improvements in surgical techniques are designed to shorten surgical time and thereby reduce patient morbidity. You can also scroll through stacks with your mouse wheel or the keyboard arrow keys.

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Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma

A juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma JNA is a growth in the area behind the nose. These growths are benign not cancer , but can damage nerves and bones and block ear and sinus drainage. Almost all JNAs are in teenage boys. Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas cause symptoms only when they're big enough to keep air from passing through the nose or press on parts of the nose and sinuses. But many think the cells that form the growths are left over from early pregnancy. Doctors will ask a child about JNA symptoms, such as trouble breathing through the nose, and do an exam.

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