LUC MONTAGNIER DNA PDF

Luc Montagnier Physiology or Medicine Thank you very much, I'm going back to a very old story at the beginning, that of DNA. DNA is of course the origin of memory, genetic memory, since a very long time, perhaps from the beginning of life, of organised life, 3. But I like to show you that maybe this is not the end of the story and DNA exist also because of water. I'd like to show this morning some recent work we have done showing that water is not only a solvent, it's also a polymer which could interact with the DNA, help the DNA and also the information from DNA to water can exist through the emission of very low electromagnetic waves.

Author:Dousar Kegis
Country:India
Language:English (Spanish)
Genre:Video
Published (Last):9 May 2010
Pages:440
PDF File Size:17.23 Mb
ePub File Size:15.82 Mb
ISBN:721-5-33165-421-5
Downloads:38330
Price:Free* [*Free Regsitration Required]
Uploader:Gasho



The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization UNESCO is potentially wading into hot water next month when it hosts a meeting set up by Nobelist Luc Montagnier to discuss his controversial research on what has become known as "the memory of water.

The meeting has so far raised little public opposition from researchers, but the announcement on UNESCO's website acknowledges its controversial nature, saying:. The promoters of this conference are aware of the critical reactions aroused by this work in parts of the scientific community, so they wish to communicate their results with the utmost rigor.

The aim is to foster a broad and multidisciplinary discussion. These data seem particularly important because they further enrich the immense achievements of molecular biology. They also suggest the development of new modes of transmission of genetic messages transmission, transduction, teleportation, etc.

Montagnier says the issue is actually getting less controversial as fresh evidence for his claims is coming in. Montagnier, 82, who shared the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine in for the discovery of HIV, stunned many fellow scientists about 5 years ago with claims that DNA emits weak electromagnetic waves that cause structural changes in water that persist even in extremely high dilutions.

Montagnier considers himself an intellectual heir to the controversial French scientist Jacques Benveniste, who claimed in a Nature paper that water can retain "memories" of compounds even when diluted at a very high level—a claim that caused a sensation in the press and was taken as support of homeopathy by its proponents, but that other scientists weren't able to replicate. Montagnier says he and his colleagues have a device that can detect such waves, which are strongest when they come from bacterial and viral genetic material.

Montagnier documented the claims in a few papers in But many scientists have been extremely skeptical. Swiss immunologist Alain de Weck, who had long known and respected Montagnier, said he was "perplexed" in Lewis and other skeptics skewered his papers.

Montagnier has also come under heavy fire for promoting long-term antibiotic treatments for children with autism; he claims his detection technique has shown that microbes play a role in that disorder. At the meeting, Montagnier says he will present new, unpublished results showing that living cells can pick up patterns of electromagnetic waves—even when they're sent over the Internet to another lab—and synthesize the DNA encoded in them.

Lewis says that UNESCO's participation may confer legitimacy on homeopathy, "with the result that people may end up harmed or killed" because they turn to homeopathy instead of proven therapies. But Montagnier says homeopathy is not on the agenda of the meeting, although he can't prevent the audience from asking questions about it.

The meeting features presentations by three other scientists. Among them is Carlo Ventura of the University of Bologna in Italy, whose presentation is titled "The voice of the stem cells: mutant vibrations and regenerative medicine. UNESCO Director-General Irina Bokova was originally scheduled to make the opening remarks but canceled her participation last week because of an agenda conflict, says Crowley, who will replace her.

All rights Reserved. Luc Montagnier. The meeting has so far raised little public opposition from researchers, but the announcement on UNESCO's website acknowledges its controversial nature, saying: The promoters of this conference are aware of the critical reactions aroused by this work in parts of the scientific community, so they wish to communicate their results with the utmost rigor.

Got a tip? How to contact the news team. Latest News. Cancer drug dampens intrusive thoughts in men with pedophilic disorder By Amanda Heidt May.

BERTRAND RUSSELL ELOGIO DE LA OCIOSIDAD PDF

UNESCO to host meeting on controversial 'memory of water' research

Book your free demo and find out what else Mya 4 from Radleys can do. Download your FREE white paper on green analytical chemistry. Philip Ball asks why a spectacular claim seems to have been overlooked. It looks like one of the most astonishing discoveries in a century, yet it was almost entirely ignored.

14644-2 ISO PDF

DNA waves don't wash

The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization UNESCO is potentially wading into hot water next month when it hosts a meeting set up by Nobelist Luc Montagnier to discuss his controversial research on what has become known as "the memory of water. The meeting has so far raised little public opposition from researchers, but the announcement on UNESCO's website acknowledges its controversial nature, saying:. The promoters of this conference are aware of the critical reactions aroused by this work in parts of the scientific community, so they wish to communicate their results with the utmost rigor. The aim is to foster a broad and multidisciplinary discussion. These data seem particularly important because they further enrich the immense achievements of molecular biology.

Related Articles