FOOD CHEMISTRY ACRYLAMIDE FROM MAILLARD REACTION PRODUCTS PDF

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Author s : Richard H. The discovery of the adventitious formation of the potential cancer-causing agent acrylamide in a variety of foods during cooking [1, 2] has raised much concern [3, 4], but the chemical mechanism s governing its production are unclear. Here we show that acrylamide can be released by the thermal treatment of certain amino acids asparagine, for example , particularly in combination with reducing sugars, and of early Maillard reaction products N -glycosides [5].

Our findings indicate that the Maillard-driven generation of flavour and colour in thermally processed foods can -- under particular conditions -- be linked to the formation of acrylamide. We heated 20 amino acids individually at [degrees]C for 30 min and found that acrylamide is formed under these conditions from methionine and from asparagine 3.

When pyrolysed at [degrees]C with an equimolar amount of glucose, asparagine in particular generates significant amounts of acrylamide, reaching an average of [micro]mol mol -1 after an incubation time t i of 30 min. If asparagine monohydrate was used in the incubation or water was added to the reaction 0.

Reaction of methionine and glutamine with equimolar amounts of glucose at [degrees]C also increased the formation of acrylamide, which occurred Food chemistry: Acrylamide from Maillard reaction products. Authors: Richard H. Date: Oct. From: Nature Vol. Publisher: Nature Publishing Group. Document Type: Article. Length: 1, words. Guy; Marie-Claude Robert; Sonja Riediker The discovery of the adventitious formation of the potential cancer-causing agent acrylamide in a variety of foods during cooking [1, 2] has raised much concern [3, 4], but the chemical mechanism s governing its production are unclear.

Access from your library This is a preview. Get the full text through your school or public library. Source Citation Stadler, Richard H. Accessed 5 June

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Acrylamide from Maillard reaction products

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Acrylamide From Maillard Reaction Products

The discovery of the adventitious formation of the potential cancer-causing agent acrylamide in a variety of foods during cooking has raised much concern, but the chemical mechanism s governing its production are unclear. Here we show that acrylamide can be released by the thermal treatment of certain amino acids asparagine, for example , particularly in combination with reducing sugars, and of early Maillard reaction products N-glycosides. Our findings indicate that the Maillard-driven generation of flavour and colour in thermally processed foods can -- under particular conditions -- be linked to the formation of acrylamide. This site needs JavaScript to work properly. Please enable it to take advantage of the complete set of features!

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Food Processing and Maillard Reaction Products: Effect on Human Health and Nutrition

Maillard reaction produces flavour and aroma during cooking process; and it is used almost everywhere from the baking industry to our day to day life to make food tasty. It is often called nonenzymatic browning reaction since it takes place in the absence of enzyme. When foods are being processed or cooked at high temperature, chemical reaction between amino acids and reducing sugars leads to the formation of Maillard reaction products MRPs. Depending on the way the food is being processed, both beneficial and toxic MRPs can be produced.

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